The Luttrell Psalter, Add MS 42130, f. 145r © British Library

Minor Medieval News – September 2016

Ever so often we stumble upon Minor Medieval News worth mentioning to the wider community of medievalists. Here they are for September 2016

Updated 23.09.2016

Medieval Academy of America Digital Humanities Prize

Medieval DigitizationWe are very pleased to announce that, beginning in 2017, the Medieval Academy of America will add a Digital Humanities Prize to its suite of publication honors, to be awarded alongside the Haskins Medal, the Brown Prize, and the Elliott Prize. The annual Medieval Academy of America Digital Humanities Prize will be awarded to an outstanding digital research project in Medieval Studies created and launched within the last five years. The Prize – an award of $1,000 – will be presented at the Medieval Academy of America’s Annual Meeting. The Digital Initiatives Advisory Board (DIAB) of the Medieval Academy of America will select the award-winning project based on DIAB’s established criteria for high-quality digital medievalist projects, considering the following criteria, among others: quality of research and contributions to Medieval Studies; goals and methodologies of the project; design, presentation, and accessibility of the project; sustainability of the project and compatibility of its metadata. Nominations are now being accepted online and must be submitted by midnight on October 15.

40% all Medieval Books from Boydell & Brewer Before 03.10.201

Representing War and Violence, 1250-1600 - CoverBoydell & Brewer is celebrating their newly-launched website, packed with many new features to help you find your books faster, purchase ebooks, streamline your library requests, and much, much more! The celebration is marked by a lovely offer of 40% off any website orders on books published under the following imprints: Boydell Press, D S Brewer, Almanach de Gotha, Camden House, James Currey, Plumbago Books, Royal Historial Society, Tamesis, Toccata Press, the University of Rochester Press and the York Medieval Press.

Enter promotional code BB191 at checkout
SALE ENDS October 3, 2016

 

Free offer of articles about medieval food and feasts, religion and medicine plus access to Exemplaria, Imago Mundi and Medieval Sermon Studies

Routledge Medieval HistoryDid you know that Routledge History offers quality, peer reviewed journals providing first class scholarship, information and analysis of Medieval history?
In this new research collection, we have brought together key, theme-based research on all things Medieval History and provided you with the opportunity to sample additional content from all featured journals free for up to 14 days via this page. Get access…

 

Brill celebrates 333-year anniversary with a 40%  sale on any book printed before 2006

Brill LogoTo celebrate Brill’s 333 year anniversary, Brill offers 40% discount on our print titles in stock, published in 2006 or earlier, during this special Autumn Sale. This unique, one-time Autumn Sale runs from 15 September through 30 November 2016.
View the full title listing.

Another car park, another King: ‘Henry I’s remains’ found beneath Reading Gaol

Searching for remains of Henry I and Reading abbey. Source: Reading Borough Council

Not that they have really found him yet. Nevertheless,  triumphant fanfares sounded when the archaeologists discovered a series of graves behind the High Altar in the now ruined Abbey Church in reading.  Might this be where Henry I was buried? And when they have dug out the hapless people, who thought they were resting in peace there, how will the team behind the excavation decide which bones were royal? Hopefully we get to be wiser next year…
Read also: Search begins for Henry I in “Hidden Abbey” in Reading

 

Jonathan Riley-Smith has Died

Jonathan Riley-Smith, historian of the crusadesProfessor Jonathan Riley-Smith (born 1938) was one the world’s foremost historians of the crusades. He worked at the universities of St Andrews, Cambridge, Royal Holloway, University of London, before he returned to Cambridge as the Dixie Professor of Ecclesiastical History in 1994 until his retirement in 2005. Riley-Smith addressed three basic main issues concerning the crusades: the definition of a crusade; the motives of crusaders; and the establishment and rule of the western settlers in the Holy Land…

Connected Histories in the Early Modern World

Workshop of Gerard David, Adoration of the Magi (c. 1514), Princeton University Art MuseumThis series aims to contribute to our growing understanding of the connectedness of the world during a period in history when an unprecedented number of people – Europeans, Africans, Asians – made transoceanic and other long distance journeys. It explores topics that highlight the cultural impact of the movement of people, animals, and objects at a global scale 1400 – 1700…

 

 

Guédelon – New Film

Guedelon 2016 © guedelon-ph-c-guerardThe Castle in Guédelon is a unique experiement. Since 1997 a group of enthusiastic archaeologists, historians and craftsmen have worked together with dedicated volunteers to recreate a medieval castle form the 13th century from the bottom up. A few years ago, the English team consisting of Ruth, Peter and John explored The Secrets of the Castle and took part in the work. Now a new film produced by Arte is showing more about the unique venture. See the film here:  Guédelon : renaissance d’un château médiéval

 

 

Pokémon Go! – The Medieval Way

Medieval version of Pokémon Go! at British LibraryOver the past few weeks, a certain new game has been captivating worldwide interest. It’s not a new Olympic sport or an updated version of Angry Birds, it’s the legendary Pokémon Go! Young and old alike have been out on the streets, climbing up trees and exploring unknown places. With their smartphone in hand, players have been tracking down rare creatures and capturing them inside Pokeballs.

It is traditionally thought that Pikachu, Squirtle and their comrades originated in Japan in the 1990s. However, revolutionary research by the Medieval Manuscripts section has unearthed some familiar scenes among the British Library’s collections.

 

 

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