University-Square-Marquee in medieval Leeds detail

Medieval Conferences 2017

Check the updated list of Medieval Conferences in 2017 – and don’t forget to write to us if we have missed yours!

We aim to mention all major conferences, symposia, workshops with an international focus and covering several days. Don’t hesitate to send us notice about upcoming conferences organised by special societies or associations. However, do note:  we don’t post the CfP’s for specific sessions, e.eg. at Leeds or Kalamazoo. On the other hand we aim to cover conferences held in all the major international languages – English, German, Italian, French and Spanish (or mixtures thereof).  So, keep it coming…

NOVEMBER

Workshop on Medieval Northern English

A page from the Magnus Cato, Bodleian, OxfordWorkshop on Medieval Northern English
Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)
06.11.2017 – 07.11.2017

Northern English, like mainland Scandinavian languages, is characterised by its tendency towards analyticity from its earliest stages, as evidenced already in the written records from the Old Northumbrian period (7th-10th centuries). There is no general agreement about the causes/motives for the early development of northern English (whether the result of language contact or language internal change, or both). It has been argued that contact with both Celtic and Scandinavian languages may have been responsible for the early processes of change (morphological simplification, loss of grammatical gender and grammaticalisation) in these varieties, but there is no general consensus as to the reasons for the changes and the period in which they started. Quantitative analysis of our medieval witnesses against the socio-cultural background in which they were written (as well as re-examination of the actual manuscripts) may shed light on many of these questions

Abstracts of approx. 250 words (excluding references) should be sent to Julia Fernández Cuesta (jcuesta@us.es) and Sara Pons-Sanz (Pons-SanzS@cardiff.ac.uk) by 1 May 2017. Read more at the Gersum Project

Reformation on the record

Martin Luther's 95 theses on door in WittenbergReformation of the Record
The National Archives in Kew,London
03.11.2017 – 04.11.2017
Deadline for Cfp: 30.04.2017

We are calling for papers on Reformation research that has been conducted using records from The National Archives, for presentation at a two-day conference, taking place in November 2017 at The National Archives in Kew, London.

2017 marks the 500th anniversary of the beginning of the Protestant Reformation, with the promulgation of Martin Luther’s 95 theses. The National Archives holds an enormous collection of public records that document the changes and continuities in governance of the Church and State in 15th, 16th and 17th century Britain and Ireland, and shed light on religious practices and popular piety. Many of these records have not been used extensively in the historiography and have the potential to offer deeper insight into this period.

It is our intention to create a network of scholars and postgraduates researching the Reformation using our documents, and to develop the profile of The National Archives as a hub for Reformation studies. The conference will form a key part of the network, bringing together current research on the Reformation and drawing on the holdings of The National Archives.

OCTOBER

The Art & Archaeology of the Silk Road

Cresques Abraham, Catalan Atlas, 1375. Detail depicting 13th century Asia with caravan on the silk road. Source: WikimediaThe Art & Archaeology of the Silk Road
Portland State University, Portland, Oregon
12.10.2017
Deadline for CfP: 15.01.2017

This international conference will feature a keynote presentation by Annette Juliano, Professor of Asian Art at the Newark branch of Rutgers University. We hope to offer a chance to reappraise key questions after shifts over the last two decades within the field, and the Call for Papers provides details of the scope. Further details on registration and local arrangements will be provided at the time we announce the preliminary schedule on March 1st. We invite papers that explore the portable arts and built environment of the Silk Road from its beginnings through the period of its fragmentation under the Mongol Empire. Papers may investigate case studies in specific visual and material culture topics, archeological sites, or take a broader, comparative approach. We are particularly interested in having a geographic range of topics represented in the material shared at the conference in order to explore possible themes such as diplomacy in art, hybridity, exoticism, regionalism, and globalization looking at both the land and maritime Silk Road routes.

Journées internationales d’archéologie mérovingienne  

Saint Lurens de Choulans a Lyon wikipedia38e journées internationales d’archéologie mérovingienne
de l’Association Française d’Archéologie Mérovingienne (AFAM)
Lyon
05.10.2017 – 08.10.2017
Deadline for CfP: 28.02.2017

La ville de l’Antiquité tardive et du haut Moyen Âge is the theme of the next meeting in the French Association for the promotion of Merovingian Archaeology. It will take place in Lyon, sponsored by the Service Archéologique de la Ville de Lyon. Focus will be on the cities between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages and offer presentations of new local discoveries. The conference is organised by Stéphane Ardouin, Emma Bouvard et Vianney Rassart from Lyon.

SEPTEMBER

Conference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art

Fundación Santa Maria la Real – Aguilar de CampoConference: The Profane within the Sacred in Medieval Art – VII Colloquium Ars Mediaevalis
Fundación Santa Maria la Real – Aguilar de Campo
2909.2017 – 01.10.2017

In his The Elementary Forms of Religious Life, the sociologist Émile Durkheim formulated the idea that the division of the world into two domains is the distinctive feature of religious thought, one containing the sacred and the other all that is profane. Durkheim’s distinction cannot be applied to medieval art, however, in which the mixing of secular motifs in religious objects, images, and architecture was characteristic – at least not without complicating the theoretical notion. The senmurf on the eleventh-century reliquary of St. Matthew in SS. Cosma e Damiano in Rome, the figure copied from Orestes on the ancient Husillos sarcophagus above the altar at Fromista, a fragment of victory killing a barbarian from a consular diptych re-used on a 11th/12th century book cover, and the incorporation of diagrams and motifs from natural science in the “aula gotica” in SS. Quattro Coronati in Rome are among myriad examples that document why this is the case. In recent decades, historians have explored the uses of such subversive elements in sacred art – from marginalia in illuminated manuscripts to coin-imagery and stamping incorporated in Eucharistic hosts. The conference Ars Mediaevalis 2017 sets out to assess the results of the advances made by the new art historiography and, more important, to open up still-unmapped paths for future study of the profane within the sacred during the Middle Ages.

Material Matters – 10th Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Medieval Association

Salzinnes AntiphonalMaterial Matters
10th Annual Meeting of the Atlantic Medieval Association
Halifax, NS Canada
22.09.2017 – 24.09.2017

“>The Atlantic Medieval Association invites paper abstracts and complete panels for its 10th annual meeting to be held September 22-24, 2017 in Halifax, Nova Scotia, hosted jointly by Dalhousie and Saint Mary’s Universities. This year’s meeting coincides with the return of the ” href=”http://www.smu.ca/academics/archives/the-salzinnes-antiphonal.html”>Salzinnes Antiphonal from the Canadian Conservation Institute to Saint Mary’s University and will be part of several events celebrating its homecoming, including a comprehensive exhibition at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia (May – October, 2017) and a concert performance of medieval chant by the Belgian ensemble Psallentes. These events will be incorporated into the conference schedule, promising a rich visual, aural and intellectual programme. For further information, contact Dr Stephanie Morley Saint Mary’s University Department of English – stephanie.morley@smu.ca or Dr Jennifer Bain Dalhousie University Fountain School of Performing Arts, Dalhousie Arts Centre – jennifer.bain@dal.ca.

Verortung, Entgrenzung, Globalisierung

Bode-Museum_(Spreeblick),smIV. Forum Kunst des Mittelalters
Berlin und Brandenburg
20.09.2017 – 23.09.2017

Das vierte Forum Kunst des Mittelalters widmet sich schwerpunktmäßig Themenbereichen, die an den geographischen und methodischen Grenzen klassischer Mittelalterforschung angesiedelt sind. Ausgangspunkt sind die Veranstaltungsorte Berlin und Brandenburg an der Havel, wo einerseits lokale mediävistische Themen zu verhandeln, andererseits reiche Sammlungsbestände zu byzantinischer und vorderasiatischer Kunst vorhanden sind. Zu thematisieren sind etwa Phänomene wie Migration, Medientransformation und kulturelle Paradigmenwechsel. Indem wir nach kulturell prägenden Regionen an den Grenzen „Europas“ und nach transkulturellen Kontaktzonen fragen, können auch Definitionen von Mittelalter zur Debatte gestellt werden. – Als Pendant zu diesem Rundblick soll auch die Forschung zur Region Brandenburg/Berlin präsentiert werden. Dazu gehören ebenfalls Themen der museologischen und kunstwissenschaftlichen Geschichte Berlins, wo die Erschließung von Zonen kulturellen Austauschs eine lange Tradition hat.

Medialatinitas 2017

Medieval Latin CommitteeUniversity of Vienna
17.09.2017 – 21.09.2017

8. Internationaler Mittellateinerkongress “Medialatinitas 2017: Mittellatein vernetzt / Medieval Latin Networks”
Vom 17. bis zum 21. September 2017 findet in Wien der 8. Internationale Mittellateinerkongress “Medialatinitas 2017” unter dem Titel “Mittellatein vernetzt / Medieval Latin Networks” statt.

 

 

Monasteries in the Digital Humanities

Deep Roots Leaflet asking for help in NorciaMonasteries in the Digital Humanities
Kraków-Tyniec, Benedictine Abbey,
13.09.2017 – 16.09.2017

Deadline for proposals: 15.11.2016

The conference is organised by the Friends of History Society in Wrocław, Branch of the Polish Historical Society, in collaboration with the Institute of History, University of Wrocław, Institute of History, University of Opole, and the Benedictine Abbey of Tyniec. The Conference will focus on the following topics: a) Presentation of the history of monasteries and religious orders on the internet (monasticons, portals and blogs, websites, databases, maps etc.).
Digital reconstruction of former monasteries, virtual monastery libraries, utility rooms in monasteries etc.b) Digitisation of the written legacy of monasteries. c) Creation of platforms providing information and bringing together scholars researching monasteries. d) Dissemination of knowledge of monasteries and religious orders online. e) Possibilities of creating an online monasticon encompassing monasteries located both in Europe (including Poland) and other parts of the world. f) Digital tools and resources in humanities research. Problems – solutions – proposals.
Please send us the proposed titles of your full papers (up to 20 min.) and short communication papers (up to 10 min.)

Renaissance College – Corpus Christi College in Context, c. 1450-1600

Corpus Christi CollegeCorpus Christi College
Oxford
06.09.2017 – 09.09.2017

Corpus Christi College, Oxford, UK. Corpus Christi College, Oxford was founded, on humanistic principles, in 1517. Its fellows included specially-appointed lecturers in Latin literature, Greek and Theology and its new trilingual library featured works in Latin, Greek and Hebrew. Throughout the sixteenth century, Corpus was a major centre of learning and religion: it played host to the Spanish humanist, Juan Luis Vives and the German astronomer and mathematician, Nicholas Kratzer; its fellows included the Catholic reformer Reginald Pole and the Protestant thinkers John Jewel and Richard Hooker. In the College’s 500th anniversary year, we shall be holding a conference to discuss the wider context and implications of this remarkable foundation, exploring the inter-connected worlds of learning and education, prelacy and public service, charity and communal life, religion, literature and the arts, in Oxford and beyond, during a hundred-and-fifty year period of Renaissance and Reformation. There will be papers from Susan Brigden, Clive Burgess, Jeremy Catto, Paul Cavill, Alex Gajda, Anthony Grafton, Nicholas Hardy, Lucy Kaufman, Pamela King, Julian Reid, Richard Rex, Miri Rubin, David Rundle, Christopher Stray, Joanna Weinberg, Magnus Williamson, and William Whyte. A round table of Mordechai Feingold, Felicity Heal and Diarmaid MacCulloch, chaired by Keith Thomas, will bring proceedings to a close.

AUGUST

Social Networking in the Early Middle Ages

Late Roman routes and milestonesRadboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands
31.08.2017 -02.09.2017
Deadline for CfP: 01.03.2017

Networks of Knowledge (NoK) & Networks and Neighbours (N&N) – two projects dedicated to interrogating social and intellectual connectivity, competition and communication between people, places and things in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages – come together to bring you an international and interdisciplinary conference – NoK’s first and N&N’s fourth – on social networking in the Early Middle Ages. The research of the conference will explore the existence, performance and sustainability of diverse scholarly, intellectual and material assemblages and topographies – networks – over a broad frame of reference. The temporal and geographical boundaries of the conference are, as of yet, flexible; they will be narrowed as the program selection and formation process progresses.

23rd European Archaeological Meeting

Building Bridges in Maastricht23rd European Archaeological Meeting
Maastricht
30.08.2017 – 02.09.2017

The theme of the conference in 2017 is Building Bridges. Six key themes have been selected for the 23rd Annual Meeting of the EAA. The EAA Executive Board, the Maastricht Conference Organisers and the Scientific Committee think the themes do relate to the most important issues at stake in contemporary archaeology. In one way or another within all themes the aim is to build bridges, whether across projects, countries, disciplines, societal groups or cultures. In most cases a multi-, inter- or transdisciplinary approach seems to be imperative. Therefore sessions involving Archaeology, History, Anthropology, History of Art, History of Science, Sociology, the Arts and/or Citizen Science are especially welcome. This is to strengthen archaeology’s relevance for society and to provide insights into what it means to be human. Within all six themes and free contributions it will be possible to fit sessions which centre either on interpreting the archaeological record, managing the archaeological heritage or raise theoretical and methodological perspectives in archaeology.

JULY

Women, Status and Power in Medieval Society

medieval women an archaeological approachThe Annual Conference of the Society for Medieval Archaeology takes place in Lincoln on June 30th and July 1st, 2017. This conference, which marks the 60th anniversary of the Society, is entitled Women, Status and Power in Medieval Society and will bring together specialists from a range of disciplines to explore the status of women in medieval society, the extent to which they could wield power – personal, administrative, political or ideological – over their own lives, over others and in times of conflict, and how evidence for this might be lost or found in the archaeological record. Further details about the conference programme and links to the conference registration site may be found on the  conference page

25th Conference of the International Arthurian Society

conference-arthurian-societyXXVth Congress of the International Arthurian Society
University in Würzburg
24.07..2017 – 29.07.2017
Deadline for CfP: 01.10.2016

Würzburg is a city rich in tradition, famous for its picturesque medieval city centre and the UNESCO World Heritage Site Würzburger Residenz. Idyllically located between vineyards in the valley of the Main River, the city is a perfect starting point for various excursions into the surrounding area of Franconia. We highly welcome contributions covering the following topics:

a.  Voice(s), Sounds and the Rhetoric of Performance
b.  Postmedieval Arthur: Print and Other Media
c.  Translation, Adaption and the Movement of texts
d.  Current State of Arthurian Editions: Problems and Perspectives
e.  Sacred and Profane in Arthurian Romance
f.   Critical Modes and Arthurian Literature: Past, Present and Future

 

Medieval Places – (Post)Modern Presences

medievalism-conference-salzburg32nd International Conference on Medievalism
University of Salzburg, Austria
16.07.2017 -18.07.2017
Deadline for CfP: 26.09.2016

The City of Salzburg is a place in which the Baroque has often been grafted onto a myriad of medieval origins. Therefore, questions about the postmedieval architectural, literary, cultural, and ideological afterlives of places and spaces (monasteries, castles, cathedrals, roads, battlefields, etc.) are a natural fit for our 2017 conference. Various modes of reception: foundational myths as well as historiographic, visual, literary, and various other representations of medieval culture (from travel guides through reenactments, feasts, and religious rituals), are all welcome as topics. How do medieval spaces and places, real and fictional, continue to live on in our individual and collective imaginations, and how are they restored, reinvented, and remembered in postmedieval times? Beyond topics related to the general conference theme –  Medieval Places – (Post)Modern Presences – the organizers will also consider proposals for individual papers and sessions (or round tables) from the general realm of the reception of medieval culture in postmedieval times.

Frater, Magister, Minister et Episcopus

BonaventureThe Franciscan Institute at St. Bonaventure University
12.07.2017 – 15.07.2017

The Franciscan Institute at St. Bonaventure University will host a major international conference dedicated to the intellectual heritage and contemporary significance of Saint Bonaventure.The title of the conferene is:  “Frater, Magister, Minister et Episcopus” The Works and Worlds of Saint Bonaventure. Individual papers, panels, and workshop proposals are sought that engage the academic, pastoral, and socio-political aspects of this topic. Proposals are due by 18.11.2017. Contact David Couturier, OFM Cap., dcouturi@sbu.edu

Winchester: An Early Medieval Royal City

Old Minster and New minster in Winchester © WECWinchester: An Early Medieval Royal City
University of Winchester 9-12 July 2017A multi- and interdisciplinary conference on the development of the city of Winchester, its cultural and political life, and its place in the early medieval world. Hosted by Winchester, The Royal City project team in association with the University of Winchester.Proposals for 20-minute papers and themed sessions of three papers are invited on aspects of the Anglo-Saxon and Anglo-Norman city of Winchester from the seventh to the twelfth centuries. These may include the structures of power and Winchester’s place in local/regional/national/global histories (e.g. the ‘Second Viking Age’ or the ‘Anarchy), communities within the city, Winchester’s ministers, representations of the Anglo-Saxon city in (early) medieval literature, the role of the city in the development of language and literature, comparative work on other early medieval royal cities (e.g. Leon, Cordoba), urban topography, or representations of the early medieval heritage of Winchester since the middle ages. The aim of the conference is to be both multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary, to think about the position of a city within a wider community, the communities of the city itself, and the perceptions of the city. Keynote speakers confirmed are Professor Martin Biddle (Emeritus Fellow, Hertford College Oxford; Director of Winchester Excavations Committee) Professor Barbara Yorke (Professor Emerita, University of Winchester, Visiting Professor, UCL).
Please send a 200-word abstract and 1-page summary CV to Ryan.Lavelle@winchester.ac.uk by 13 February 2017. Contact Ryan.Lavelle@winchester.ac.uk and/or Carolin.Esser-Miles@winchester.ac.uk for enquiries.

Communities, Imaginations and Emotions in the Medieval Mediterranean.

Genova-medievaleUniversity of Ghent, Belgium.
10.07.2017 – 12.07.2017

This years conference organised by the Society for the Medieval Mediterranean focus on emotions, imaginations and communities in, of and across the Medieval Mediterranean. The theme invites a variety of lines of inquiry, a number of which are suggested below: How were emotions produced, expressed and communicated? To what end were imaginations used and abused? In what ways were communities perceived and understood? What communalities and particularities are there? Which challenges do the literary, historical, archaeological and other sources pose in this respect? Topics of the conference include, but are by no means limited to: – Emotional and imagined communities – Selfing and othering – Identity and alterity, senses of belonging, ties that bond – Memory, nostalgia and the imagined or idealized past – Mirabilia, wonders and magic – Worldviews and other social schemata – Mobility across borders – Emotional and communal dimensions to identity – Honour and shame, social codes and values – Emotions bodily felt, orally expressed – Reading and sharing emotions – Methodological problems when inquiring emotions and imaginations.
Specific questions about the conference can be directed to the conference organizers, Professor Jo Van Steenbergen, Dr Kristof D’hulster and Dr Joachim Yeshaya at the conference email address Email: smm2017@ugent.be

International Medieval Congress 2017 – Special Focus: “Others”

IMC_Postcard_2017_Front_1Leeds University
03.07.2017 – 06.07.2017

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome. However, every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which – for 2017 – is ‘Otherness’. This focus has been chosen for its wide application across all centuries and regions and its impact on all disciplines devoted to this epoch.

 

Natures in between. Environments in areas of contact among states, economic systems, cultures and religions.
ESEH Biennial Conference 2017

Medieval environment - king beneath rainUniversity of Zagreb, Department of Geography together with the History Department and the University of Zadar, Department of Geography
Zagreb, Croatia.
28.06.2017 – 02.07.2017

The European Society for Environmental History’s next biannual conference will be held in Zagreb in Croatia. Proposals are encouraged inside the following themes:
Environment in areas of contact among states, economic systems, cultures and religions, Environmental history of post-socialist countries of Eastern Europe, Environment shared among cultures: spatial and temporal dimension, Environmental history of borders and borderland areas, Environmental history of the Mediterranean, Urban environmental history, Forest history, Industrial and post-industrial environmental history, Production, consumption and waste: commodity chains in environmental history, Cultural values and economic interests: retrospective environmental analyses ,Theories and methods in environmental history

JUNE

Evil in The Middle Ages

medieval dungeonEvil in the Middle Ages
Paris
29.06.2017 – 01.07, 2017
Deadline for CfP: 05.11.2016

For its 14th Annual Symposium, the International Medieval Society invites abstracts on the theme of Evil in the Middle Ages. The concept of evil, and the tensions it reveals about the relationship between internal and external identities, fits well into recent trends in scholarship that have focused attention on medieval bodies, boundaries, and otherness. This Symposium will explore (but is not limited to) three broad themes:

  • Concepts of evil: discourse on morality and moral understandings of evil; reflections on the relationship between good and evil; heresy and heretical beliefs, teachings, writings; evil and sin; evil and conscience; associations with hell, the devil; types of evil behaviour or evil thoughts; categories of evil; evil as disorder/chaos; evil as corruption; evil and mankind
  • Embodied evil/being evil/evil beings: monstrosity; the demonic; perceptions of deformity and disfigurement; evil transformations and metamorphoses; magic and the supernatural; outward expressions of evil (e.g. through clothing, material possessions); evil objects
  • Responses to evil: punishments; the purging and/or exorcism of evil; inquisition; evil speech; warnings about evil (textual, visual,
    musical); ways to avoid evil or to protect oneself (talismans etc.); the temptation of evil; emotional responses to evil; social exclusion as a response to evil.

The IMS-Paris is an interdisciplinary, bilingual (French/English) organisation that fosters exchanges between French and foreign scholars. For the past ten years, the IMS has served as a centre for medievalists who travel to France to conduct research, work, or study. For more information about the IMS-Paris and past symposia programmes, please visit our website: www.ims-paris.org.

The Normans in the South: Mediterranean Meetings in the Central Middle Ages

normans in Palermo ChapelSt Edmund Hall, University of Oxford
30.06.2017 – 02.07.2017
By some accounts, 1017 marked the advent of the Norman presence in Italy and Sicily, inaugurating a new era of invasion, interaction and integration in the Mediterranean. Whether or not we decide the millennial anniversary is significant, the moment offers an ideal opportunity to explore the story in the south, about a thousand years ago. To what extent did the Normans establish a cross-cultural empire? What can we learn by comparing the impact of the Norman presence in different parts of Europe? What insights are discoverable in comparing local histories of Italy and Sicily with broader historical ideas about transformation, empire and exchange? The conference aims to draw together established, early-career and post-graduate scholars for a joint investigation of the Normans in thesouth, to explore together the many meetings of cultural, political and religious ideas in the Mediterranean in the central Middle Ages.

Gothic Modernisms Conference

postmodern-gothic-architecture-in-londonGothic Modernism
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam
29.06.2017 -30.06.2017
Deadline for CfP: 20.12.2016

Organized by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Coventry University; the Amsterdam School for Heritage, Memory and Material Culture, in collaboration with the Rijksmuseum, the Ateneum Art Museum / Finnish National Gallery, Helsinki, and Radboud University, Nijmegen.

Gothic Modernisms will focus on the (global) legacies, histories and contested identities of Northern European Gothic/early-modern visual cultures in modernity and, in particular, on identities of modernism, including avant-gardes. It builds on two preceding, related conferences on ‘Primitive Renaissances’ (The National Gallery, London, 2014) and ‘Visions of the North’ (Compton Verney Museum, 2016), which have opened new scholarship on 19th- and early 20th-century responses to Northern Renaissance and early Germanic art. Gothic Modernisms will expand this field of enquiry and its temporal scope. It explores the pivotal, yet still understudied, reception, construction and invention of Northern Gothic art and reception in the period spanning the 1880s to the 1950s, extending interest in Latin and Germanic Gothic to the ‘Nordic’ world. We term these artistic and cultural reinventions ‘gothic modernisms’.
The conference thus aims to develop both a broad perspective in relation to gothic modernisms and a deepening of the issues—methodological, theoretical, aesthetic, archival—pertinent to this subject. In particular, we seek papers which pose fresh questions about the modern reception and practices of medieval art in institutions and museums, as well as in art, art historiographies, art writings and broader visual-cultural contexts. ‘Gothic Modernisms’ forms the culminating event in a trilogy of conferences investigating the modern and modernist reception of Northern medieval and Renaissance masters in Europe, beginning with ‘Primitive Renaissances’ (National Gallery, London: 2014) and continuing with ‘Visions of the North’ (Compton Verney Museum, UK: 2016).

After Chichele: Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443 to 1517

chichele funeral memorialSaint Anne’s College, 56 Woodstock Rd, Oxford OX2 6HS, United Kingdom
28.06.2017 – 30.06.2017

An international conference organised by the Faculty of English, University of Oxford, this event builds on the success of the 2009 Oxford conference, After Arundel: Religious Writing in Fifteenth-Century England, which resulted in a book of essays (ed. by Vincent Gillespie and Kantik Ghosh) that vigorously interrogated the nature of religious and intellectual culture in England in the long fifteenth century. After Chichele adopts a similar investigative and interdisciplinary approach. The period has been chosen precisely because the inner workings of English intellectual and religious life during these years have proved challengingly resistant to the formation of grand critical narratives. What are the chief currents driving the intellectual and cultural life of the church in England during this period? What happened to intellectual questioning during the period, and where did the Church’s cultural life express itself most vividly? What significant parochial, regional, national and international influences were brought to bear on English literate practices? In order to address these questions, the conference will adopt an interdisciplinary focus, inviting contributions from historians, literary scholars, and scholars working on the theology, ecclesiastical history, music and art of the period, and it is expected that a wide range of literary and cultural artefacts will be considered, from single-authored works to manuscript compilations, from translations to original works, and from liturgy to art and architecture, with no constraints as to the conference’s likely outcomes and conclusions. It is intended that the conference should generate a volume of essays similar to After Arundel in scope, ambition and quality.

Middle Ages in the Modern World

mamo 2017 the Middle Ages in the modern worldManchester University
28.06.2017 – 01.07.2017

Every other year a group of scholars organize a multidisciplinary conference on medievalism in the post-Middle Ages, MAMO. The third will be held in Manchester in July 2017
MAMO 3 – the Middle Ages in the Modern World
Submission of proposals for panels, roundtables, and individual papers are invited by 30.09.2016. Panels can consist of three short papers (20 minutes) or four of fifteen minutes’ duration; roundtables should consist of no more than six speakers.  Abstracts and proposals should not exceed 250 words and should be sent, as attachments in Word, to mamo.conference@manchester.ac.uk.

Women’s Literary Culture and The Medieval Canon

trotulaWomen’s Literary Culture and The Medieval Canon. International Conference organised as part of the international Network: Women’s Literary Culture and the Medieval Canon.
University of Bergen
22.06.2017 -24.06.2017

This international conference is organized by Professor Diane Watt and Dr Laura Saetveit Miles as part of the Leverhulme International Network: Women’s Literary Culture and the Medieval Canon. For further information please visit the network website.

Over the last three decades medieval women’s writing has become a significant focus of innovative research. Yet, despite this wealth of ground-breaking scholarship, the established canon of medieval  literature has remained fundamentally unchallenged. This conference will explore the importance of considering women’s engagement with textual culture in understanding the medieval literary canon. While the network has hitherto focused largely on English texts and traditions, the organisers welcome papers that focus on European sources. Deadline for CfP: 15.09.2016

Lineage, Loyalty, and Legitimacy in Iberia and North Africa (600­-1600)

Great Mosque of KairouanLineage, Loyalty, and Legitimacy in Iberia and North Africa (600­-1600)
Saint Louis University
19.06.2017 – 21.06.2017
Deadline for CfP: 15.12.2016

The Center of Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Saint Louis University in conjunction with the Medieval Iberia and North Africa Group at the University of Chicago invite abstracts for an upcoming conference, “Lineage, Loyalty, and Legitimacy in Iberia and North Africa (600‐1600),” to be held at the SLU campus on June 19‐21, 2017 during the 5th Annual Symposium of Medieval and Renaissance Studies. The aim of this subconference is to build on recent scholarship which has sought to move beyond notions of “the state” as a mode of inquiry in Iberian and North African studies, and to promote instead a more holistic, interdisciplinary approach to the study of the politics, cultural production, and religious practices of these regions. Toward that end, this conference will bring together scholars from a range of disciplines in order to facilitate conversations about the relationships between politics, historiography, art, literature, and religion in medieval and early modern Iberia and North Africa.

Fifth Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies

The Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies 2015The Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Saint Louis University
St. Louis, MO
19.06.2017 – 21.06.2017
Deadline for CfP: 31.12.2016

The Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies provides a convenient summer venue in North America for scholars in all disciplines to present papers, organize sessions, participate in roundtables, and engage in interdisciplinary discussion. The goal of the symposium is to promote serious scholarly investigation of the medieval and early modern worlds. We invite proposals for papers, sessions, and roundtables on all topics and in all disciplines of medieval and early modern studies. Proposals from learned societies and scholarly associations are particularly welcome. The deadline for proposals submissions is December 31. The plenary speakers for this year will be Christopher Baswell, of Barnard College and Columbia University, and Bruce Campbell, of Queen’s University, Belfast.

MAY

Le XIXe siècle en lumière: redécouverte et revalorisation de l’enluminure médiévale en France au temps du livre industriel

Capture-d’ecran-2016-07-23-à-19.35.52-e1469653601835Le XIXe siècle en lumière
Rennes, Université Rennes 2
18.05.2017 – 19.05.2017

Moins connu que la réhabilitation de l’architecture gothique ou la redécouverte des tableaux des Primitifs, le regain d’intérêt pour l’enluminure médiévale fut pourtant l’une des manifestations majeures du vaste mouvement de « retour au Moyen Âge » qui gagna l’Europe presque toute entière au XIXe siècle. Mais si ce phénomène est aujourd’hui bien identifié pour l’Angleterre et la Belgique, les recherches spécifiques sur la France demeurent encore peu nombreuses malgré un patrimoine exceptionnel.

En lien avec l’exposition Trésors enluminés de Normandie qui se tiendra au Musée des Antiquités de Rouen du 5 décembre 2016 au 19 mars 2017, ce colloque a pour ambition d’établir une première synthèse d’envergure sur la connaissance et la compréhension que les Français avaient de cet art, des années 1800 jusqu’à la veille de la première guerre mondiale, en envisageant le problème sous tous ses aspects, depuis la bibliophilie jusqu’aux entreprises éditoriales, en passant par les travaux d’érudition ou encore la pratique artistique.

The Rethinking of Religious Belief in the Making of Modernity

Bruegel Babel TowerThe American University in Bulgaria, Blagoevgrad
30.05.2017 – 01.6.2017

The relationship between religious belief and modernity has been interpreted in different ways by intellectual historians. Some historiographical currents argue that modern secular societies developed thanks to the gradual emergence of such ideas as “reasonableness”, “natural religion” and “toleration” among certain religious movements of reform and renewal from the Late Middle Ages to the twentieth century. Other sections of historiography maintain that the making of modernity was produced by a process of secularization, which benefited from the spread of intellectual and cultural currents that, in the Age of Enlightenment, held essentially atheistic and materialistic ideas in philosophy and republican, democratic views in politics. Still others have seen modernity as emerging both from and against a religious, and specifically Christian, worldview, given that the rethinking of several religious concepts, texts and institutions since the Renaissance eventually had secularizing consequences. Please submit all paper and panel proposals, in English, using the online submission form by 31 December 2016.

The Medieval Iberian Treasury in the Context of Muslim-Christian Interchange

Chalice of dona Urraca from Leon, SpainThe Medieval Iberian Treasury in the Context of Muslim-Christian Interchange
Princeton University, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies
19.05.2017 – 20.05.2017

In collaboration with the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas in Madrid and Princeton’s departments of Art & Archaeology and History, the Index of Christian Art will sponsor a two-day interdisciplinary conference, “The Medieval Iberian Treasury in the Context of Muslim-Christian Interchange,” on 19-20 May 2017.

The medieval treasury offers an extraordinary material witness to the desires, aspirations, and self-conception of its creators. Treasuries could function as sources of gifts (and obligations) for their allies, as prestigious private storehouses for ostentation before an elite audience, or as financial reserves that could be made use of in times of need. Luxury items from non-Christian cultures, such as the many Islamic objects that found their way into church treasuries, or those made from materials of great intrinsic value, such as ivory, gold, silver, or silk, became even more valuable if the piece were turned to a sacred use. We will examine these dimensions of the treasury by giving special emphasis to the rich holdings of the royal-sponsored monastery of San Isidoro de León in northern Spain. Taken as a whole, both texts and objects offer a rich body of evidence for interdisciplinary investigation and serve as a springing point for larger questions about sumptuary collections and their patrons across Europe and the Mediterranean during the central Middle Ages. Hosted at the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies, the conference brings together international and US scholars from multiple disciplines and professions, with specializations including Islamic law and sumptuary production, Christian chronicles, patronage and royal studies, identity and gender studies, and political history across the cultures of medieval Spain. The diversity of questions and perspectives addressed by these scholars will shed light on the nature of treasury collections, as well as on the broad efficacy of multidisciplinary study for the Middle Ages. For further information, contact Pamela Patton: ppatton@princeton.edu

Living on the Edge: Transgression, Exclusion, and Persecution in the Middle Ages

Medieval ShouldersLiving on the Edge: Transgression, Exclusion, and Persecution in the Middle Ages
Barcelona, 17–19 May 2017.

It is widely accepted that the essence of a manuscript cannot be fully grasped without studying its marginalia. Glosses, the most medieval of techniques, sit on the margins of the text and clarify it, adding a whole new dimension to it and becoming an inextricable part of its content. Similarly, no society can be fully understood without knowledge of what lies on its margins, for the outliers of any given culture provide us with just as much information as its alleged foundational principles. In a time when the Western world ponders building walls up against perceived threats and frightening differences, it seems especially important to recall that it is mostly through tearing down walls that we learned our way forward.The conference “Living on the Edge: Transgression, Exclusion, and Persecution in the Middle Ages” aims to address the widespread medieval phenomenon of transgression as both a result of and the cause for the exclusion and persecution of those who were considered different. We invite papers from postgraduate and early career scholars that explore social, gender, sexual, religious, political, intellectual, and artistic transgression, as well as those that analyse the different instances of exclusion and persecution of individuals and communities in the medieval period. We welcome scholars from a range of disciplines, including history, philology, art history, philosophy, and archaeology to submit proposals for 20 minute papers. Please email an abstract of no more than 300 words to congress.ardit@ub.edu before 31st January 2017 including your personal details (name, affiliation, and contact address). The main language of the conference will be English but papers in Catalan, Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese are also welcome. With the support of: Institute for Research on Medieval Cultures (IRCVM – Universitat de Barcelona)
Master’s Programme in Medieval Cultures (Universitat de Barcelona)Doctoral Programme in Medieval Cultures (Universitat de Barcelona) and the Vice-Rectorate for Academic Policy, Students and Quality (Universitat de Barcelona)

Kalamazoo 2017

Kalamazoo booksInternational Congress on Medieval Studies
11.05.2017 -14.05.2017

Hosted by Western Michigan University’s Medieval Institute, the International Congress on Medieval Studies is an annual gathering of around 3,000 scholars interested in medieval studies. The congress features  550-575 sessions of papers, panel discussions, roundtables, workshops and performances. There are also some 100 business meetings and receptions sponsored by learned societies, associations and institutions. The exhibits hall boasts nearly 70 exhibitors, including publishers, used book dealers and purveyors of medieval sundries. The congress lasts three and a half days, extending from Thursday morning, with sessions beginning at 10 a.m., until Sunday at noon.

APRIL

Architectural Representation in the Middle Ages

Building Alexandria. Netherlands 14th cent. Royal 20 BLArchitectural Representation in the Middle Ages
University College, Oxford
07.04.2017 – 08.04.2017

The architectural remnants of the Middle Ages—from castles and cathedrals to village churches—provide many people’s first point of contact with the medieval period and its culture. Such concrete survivals provide a direct link to the material experience of medieval people. At the same time, exploring the ways in which architecture was conceptualized and depicted can contribute to our understanding of the ideological and imaginative worldview of the period. This two-day conference is intended to facilitate discussion and collaboration on all aspects of architectural representation, understood broadly to encompass actual, symbolic, or imaginary architectural features, whether still standing today, observable in the archaeological record, or surviving only through depiction in literature or art. The conference is interdisciplinary in outlook, and we hope to welcome papers from across the spectrum of academic disciplines, including literature, history, art, theology, and archaeology.

The Material Culture of Religious Change and Continuity, 1400-1600

Medieval Material culture - GradualeUniversity of Huddersfield
11.04.2017 – 12.04.2017
 
The Material Culture of Religious Change and Continuity, 1400-1600 11-12 April 2017 at the University of Huddersfield, UK 2017 marks the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther nailing his 95 theses on the Wittenberg Church. From that date, religion in Europe had profound changes. One such change was how people viewed, interacted and created visual and material objects related to religious devotion. This conference aims to bring together medievalists and early modernists approaching religion on either side of the Reformation together.

Family and Power in the Middle Ages

family and power in the middle agesFamily and Power in the Middle Ages
Canterbury Christ Church University
North Holmes Road, Canterbury, Kent, CT1 1QUo7.04.2017 – 08.4.2017

Topics of the conference include, but are by no means limited to: Gender, Social and cultural history, Households and estates, Childhood and the life cycle, Emotion, Familial hierarchies, Power at all levels of society, Families in times of war.  Proposals between 250–300 words for individual 20 minute papers relating to the conference theme. Keynote speakers: Prof. Lindy Grant and Dr. Jennifer Ward. Please send abstracts to: familyandpower2017@gmail.com. Deadline: Please send abstracts by Friday 2nd December 2016. Applicants will be notified regarding the acceptance of their paper by late January 2017.

Objects and Possessions: Material Goods in a Changing World 1200-1800.

medieval drinking horn British MuseumAvenue Campus, University of Southampton, UK.
03.04.2017 – 06.04.2017

This interdisciplinary conference looks at material culture across a long timeframe in order to explore the worlds of goods and objects across Europe and its overseas colonies, the connections and relationships facilitated by the exchange of goods, the importance and interpretation of the inheritance of goods and objects, and the ways in which goods brokered relationships between Europe and the wider world in the period. The aim is to deepen our understanding of how goods ‘worked’ in a variety of social, economic and cultural contexts. We know a great deal about real property and the possession of land, but comparatively little about goods and chattels and their connections, and how these developed across a long timeframe. Over the period 1200‒1800 there were great changes in the type, range and availability of goods, from the finest items of the elite, the work of craftsmen on an individual basis, to the manufacture and widespread availability of cheap and utilitarian goods and equipment. Keynote speakers include Dr Chris Briggs (Cambridge), Professor Giorgio Riello (Warwick) and Professor James Walvin (York).

Economic History Society Annual Conference 2017.

Coins from Kiskunmajsán, Hungary 1241

Royal Holloway, University of London, UK
31.03.2017 – 02.04.2017

The conference programme committee welcomes proposals on all aspects of economic and social history covering a wide range of periods and countries, and particularly welcomes papers of an interdisciplinary nature. Registration, sessions, accommodation and meetings will all be located on campus. Please note that residential delegates will be allocated ensuite bedroom accommodation. deadline for CfP is 05.09.2016

MARCH

The Secret and the Hidden in the Middle Ages

Vatican archivesGeheimnis und Verborgenes im Mittelalter
University of Bonn
19.03.2017 – 22.03.2017

Secrets constitute society and culture; their “invention […] is the formative act of culture” (Aleida and Jan Assmann). The limits of the knowable form a clear line between the common knowledge of a society or culture, that is to say between what everybody knows (about each other), and the stock of knowledge restricted to a few. Secrets themselves, as well as those limits, are as integral to cultures as are the limitations of knowledge attainable only through human curiosity, like the arcana of nature. Likewise, the limits of knowledge about matters, which are conceived of as being not (yet) knowable and which do not reveal themselves entirely in revelations (such as the nature of the otherworld or the attributes of God), for example, play a similar role. Non-Christian religions, in particular, often demonstrate an ambivalence towards secrets. The symposium aims to investigate the function of these phenomena in different “medieval” (hence: pre-modern European and non-European) forms of society. The veil, the door, the mirror, the treasure and the book are recurrent manifestations of the secret. Furthermore, the concept and phenomenon of the hidden can be connected with spaces and objects beyond one’s kin and to their respective functions in societies, such as treasure chambers or the objects retained in them. Individuals and groups of people put out of reach are often surrounded by mystery and belong to this category.

48th Annual Conference of the Association for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies

The Castle of Ponferrada in Spain48th Annual Conference of the ASPHS
New York 16.03.2017 – 19.03.2017
Sponsored by New York University
deadline for CfP: 05.12.2016

The 48th Annual Conference of the ASPHS will take place on 16-19 March 2017 on the campus of New York University in New York, NY. The ASPHS invites session proposals for panels and/or individual presentations on any aspect of Iberian and Iberian-Atlantic history, art history, or literature. The typical panel will include three papers, a chairperson, and a discussant.  We welcome proposals for roundtable discussions of a particular work or theme.  Proposals should include a 200-word abstract for each paper and a one-page curriculum vitae for each participant, including chairs and discussants. Please include each participant’s name and e-mail address, along with any requests for audio/visual equipment or other special requirements. Participants in the conference must be members of the ASPHS.  Graduate students presenting a paper for the first time at an ASPHS conference will receive a free membership for their first year, but must still submit the necessary paperwork.  Membership information may be found on the website of ASPHS.  Please direct further questions about membership to the Membership Secretary, Scott Eastman (seastman@creighton.edu).

State-Rooms of Royal and Princely Palaces in Europe

Sintra in PortugalState-Rooms of Royal and Princely Palaces in Europe (14th-16th c.): Spaces, Images, Rituals
Lisbon/Sintra
15.03.2017 – 17.03.2017
Organised by Heraldica Nova

From the fourteenth to the sixteenth century, European monarchies saw a  gradual centralisation of power. This was accompanied by the dissemination of political ideas that contributed to the making of a  new image of the prince, which relied on visual instruments to assert  and construct the prince’s sovereign power. Royal and princely residences were at the centre of this phenomenon. In these privileged spaces, the sovereign accommodated an expanding entourage, and received messengers and guests from other courts .  Consequently, it was in these buildings that court society developed in  the first place. It is therefore not surprising that these palaces played an important part in the self-representation of the sovereign and his court, be it by the arrangement of the spaces and their permanent and ephemeral decoration, or by the common and extraordinary rituals that took place here. In these spaces, designated state-rooms appeared to be vital for constructing an effective image of the monarchy. They were an essential, often architecturally separate part of the palatial structure. Their decors, particularly during ceremonies, reflected political interests and ambitions that were essential to the image of the prince. Outside such ceremonies, state-rooms frequently served as a meeting place of the court, or even as a point of interest to be seen and commented on by spectators and panegyrists. By placing a particular emphasis on the decor of those state-rooms, this workshop aims to increase our insights into the relations between the architecture, decoration, and rituals of monarchical power in state-rooms from the late middle ages to the beginning of the early modern period.

The Medieval Brain Workshop

The Medieval BrainThe Medieval Brain Workshop.
University of York
10.03.2017 – 11.03. 2017.

As we research aspects of the medieval brain, we encounter complications generated by medieval thought and twenty-first century medicine and neurology alike. Our understanding of modern-day neurology, psychiatry, disability studies, and psychology rests on shifting sands. Not only do we struggle with medieval terminology concerning the brain, but we have to connect it with a constantly-moving target of modern understanding. Though we strive to avoid interpreting the past using presentist terms, it is difficult – or impossible – to work independently of the framework of our own modern understanding. This makes research into the medieval brain and ways of thinking both challenging and exciting. As we strive to know more about specifically medieval experiences, while simultaneously widening our understanding of the brain today, we much negotiate a great deal of complexity.

In this two-day workshop, to be held at the University of York on Friday 10th and Saturday 11th March 2017 under the auspices of the Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders, we will explore the topic of ‘the medieval brain’ in the widest possible sense. The ultimate aim is to provide a forum for discussion, stimulating new collaborations from a multitude of voices on, and approaches to, the theme.

Sewanee Medieval Colloquium.

Colloquium margin chatting- geeseSewanee Medieval Colloquium.
10.03.2017 -11.03.2017

The Sewanee Medieval Colloquium invites papers engaging with the space of the margin and the border in all aspects of medieval cultures.

Located atop the Cumberland Plateau, on the 13,000-acre campus of the University of the South, the Sewanee Medieval Colloquium is a place for conversation, for colloquy: it allows for the sharing of ideas, the testing of new work, and the forming of new relationships. Surrounded by bluffs and forest coves, Sewanee’s neo-Gothic campus offers a beautiful and intimate setting for academic conversation about the past and the future. Our small size and careful organization means that the work of everyone who comes to deliver a paper at the Sewanee Medieval Colloquium will find engagement and response. We never have more than three concurrent sessions, so that every paper has an audience, Also, every panel has a respondent, usually a major figure in the field, to offer extended comment on each paper and the session as a whole. We also know that many doctoral students and adjuncts, and, more and more, professors in general, receive little to no support to attend professional conferences. However, conferences are the places at which scholarship happens for so many in our profession. The Sewanee Medieval Colloquium offers the opportunity for medieval scholars across various disciplines to converse with each other on a theme, to hear lectures, to share papers, and to take part in seminars, to find and to bring challenging new perspectives, to build friendships and encourage collaboration.

Encounters and Re-imaginings: Medieval Scandinavia and the World.

viking-shipBerkely University
03.03.2017 – 04.03.2017

Scandgrads, the graduate organization affiliated with the Department of Scandinavian at the University of California, Berkeley is proud to announce an interdisciplinary graduate student symposium: From the shores of Vínland to the halls of Byzantium, the Norse travelled widely and encountered many cultures-which in turn influenced Norse society at home. Traces of these journeys can be found in the archaeological record, saga narratives, and modern interpretations thereof. Moreover, continental ideas and literary forms-from romances to saints’ lives-informed Scandinavian intellectual and everyday life. The organizing committee welcomes papers exploring encounters and re-imaginings across the Old Norse world, as well as echoes and influences of medieval Scandinavia in modern contexts. Any student or early career researcher is welcome to submit a proposal related to the conference theme in areas of study including but not limited to: literary studies, material culture, migration, law, politics, religious studies, reception studies, linguistics, and textual studies.
All interested applicants are encouraged to submit an abstract of 200 words to the organizing committee at scandgrads@gmail.com by August 31, 2016.

NOS-HS (Nordisk samarbetsnämnd för humanistisk och samhällsvetenskaplig forskning), exploratory workshop project “The Hansa in the North – Cultural and Social Transformations. A Reassessment”

Social Networks, Cultural Communication and Everyday Life: the Hansa and beyond

hanseatic city of BergenSocial Networks, Cultural Communication and Everyday Life: the Hansa and beyond
University of Tampere, Finland
Workshop II
02.03.2017 – 04.03.2017

Scandinavia and the wider Nordic area were in many ways a core region of Hansa activities, but the nature and significance of the connections with the Hansa is still a matter of debate, with valuations differing widely. Historiography was the main topic of the first workshop of our NOS-HS project, organised by Carsten Jahnke (University of Copenhagen) in Höör, Skåne in June 2016.
The second workshop, organised by Christian Krötzl at the University of Tampere in March 2017, will focus on the role of social networks and cultural communication in society, in local communities and in everyday life situations, with the aim of mapping future research fields, too. How did Hansa merchants, craftsmen and their families interact with the local population, socially, culturally and on an everyday level? How did the situation in and around separate merchant settlements (as in Bergen) differ from those many Northern towns, where Hansa merchants were an integrated part of the urban community? How did Hansa craftsmanship and cultural influences spread to the rural areas and communities? Most towns in the Northern and Baltic areas were multicultural and multilingual entities. How did various ethnic, cultural and linguistic groups interact with Hansa merchants and craftsmen? Did identities change or even merge?
How were the family and gender roles shaped and modified? How did everyday life change and transform in various social groups? Did Hansa merchants and craftsmen adapt to local customs, and viceversa? Which kind of interaction was to be observed in religious life and what was the impact of Hansa networks in spreading religious and cultural influences? Knowledge transfer, from basic education and professional training to university studies is an important area to be reassessed, too.

Participants may include researchers from different stages, senior scholars, as well as early career researchers. The workshop is sponsored by the NOS-HS, so expenses can be covered, if your paper is accepted. Participation is possible also with external funding.

FEBRUARY

Paradigm Shifts During the Global Middle Ages and Renaissance – 23rd Annual ACMRS Conference (2017)

acmrs23rd Annual ACMRS Conference
09.02.2017 – 11.02.2017
Embassy Suites Phoenix-Scottsdale Hotel, 4415 E Paradise Village Pkwy S, Phoenix, AZ 85032

Online submission date(s): 
Friday, April 1, 2016 to Friday, December 2, 2016
ACMRS  welcomes papers that explore any topic related to the study and teaching of the Middle Ages and Renaissance and especially those that focus on the general theme of “Paradigm Shifts during the Global Middle Ages and Renaissance.” 
In 2017 the conference will be open to students and members of the general public who may be interested in attending. Email acmrs@acmrs.org with any questions.

ANZAMEMS 2017 focus on the theme of mobility and exchange.

cropped-british-library-ms-royal-15-e-vi-croppedANZAMEMS 2017,
Wellington, New Zealand
07.02.2017 – 10.07.2017

CFP closes 1 September, 2016

ANZAMEMS, The biennial conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies will be held at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, on 7-10 February 2017, on the theme of mobility and exchange.

We welcome paper and panel proposals addressing any aspect of this theme, including: social, cultural, and intellectual exchange, the circulation of texts, ideas, and people
commercial and mercantile exchange, legal interchange, transport and transportation, rural and urban mobilities, pilgrimage, exploration, and migration, transglobal and trans-temporal medievalisms and early modernisms. Plenary speakers: Dr Erin Griffey (Art History, Auckland), Professor Martha Howell (History, Columbia), Professor Lorna Hutson (English Literature, St Andrews), Professor Cary Nederman (Political Science, Texas A&M University).

Art and the Reformation Colloqium in Los Angeles

Portrait of Count Palatine Philipp the Warlike Hans Baldung Grien 1517Art and the Reformation Colloqium in Los Angeles
Los Angeles, Getty Research Institute,
02.02.2017 – 03.02.2017

The Getty Research Institute presents a two-day international scholarly colloquium featuring new discoveries and insights into art and the Reformation. The program is organized in cooperation with colleagues from the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden, and the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen München on the occasion of the exhibition Renaissance and Reformation: German Art in the Age of Dürer and Cranach, on view at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

JANUARY

First Conference of Byzantine and Medieval Studies

First Conference of Byzantine and Medieval Studies
Nicosia, Cyprus
13.01.2017 – 14.01.2017
Deadline for CfP: 01.10.2016

The Byzantinist Society of Cyprus invites papers to be presented at the First Conference of Byzantine and Medieval Studies, to be held in Nicosia, Cyprus, on Friday, 13 and Saturday, 14 of January 2017. Scholars, researchers and students are encouraged to present their ongoing research, work-in-progress or fieldwork report on any aspect of the history, archaeology, art, architecture, literature, philosophy and religion of Cyprus and the Eastern Mediterranean during the Byzantine, Medieval and Ottoman periods. The languages of the conference will be Greek, English, French and German.

Encountering the Material Medieval

material-medieval-conference-st-andrewsEncountering the Material Medieval
St. Andrews
19.01.2017 – 20.01.2017Deadline for CfP: 15.011.2016

The University of St Andrews School of Art History in collaboration with the St Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies (SAIMS) present Encountering the Material Medieval, an interdisciplinary conference on materiality and material engagements with the medieval, taking place on 19-20 January 2017 in St Andrews, Scotland. Beyond the digital humanities, we are interested in material engagements with the medieval. This takes place in the library, where we encounter manuscripts in an intimate, skin-to-skin contact; during fieldwork, when we need to crouch in order to enter a medieval altar; in one’s own kitchen, when we try to reproduce a recipe freshly transcribed from a manuscript; or on the fairground, where we can hold in our own hand a replica of medieval pottery.

Gender, Places, Spaces, Thresholds

The bearded woman of Limerick, Gerald of Wales, Topographia Hiberniae , London BL Royal 13 B VIII, fol. 19r, c. 1196-1223, a book owned by a fifteenth-century monk of St Augustine’s Abbey, Canterbury17th Conference organised by the UK organisation: Gender and Medieval Studies
Christ Church University, Canterbury
12.01.2017 -15.01.2017
Keynote speakers: Anthony Bale, Leonie Hicks, Sheila Sweetinburgh
Deadline for CfP:  07.09.2016

We are looking for papers that explore the relationships between gender and medieval geographical, cultural, social, spatial, and imagined locations – as well as those which explore aspects of gender and liminalities. In viewing the materiality of place and space through the lens of gender, we wish to encourage both cross- and trans-disciplinary discourses concerning how gender is rendered stable and unstable via networks, objects (relics for example), individuals, communities, and exchanges in the Middle Ages.

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