Medieval Histories http://www.medievalhistories.com News about the Middle Ages Thu, 02 Jul 2015 07:27:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=329 Gospels of Queen Theutberga up for Sale at Christie’shttp://www.medievalhistories.com/gospels-of-queen-theutberga-up-for-sale-at-christies/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/gospels-of-queen-theutberga-up-for-sale-at-christies/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 13:57:07 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14605 This summer Christies auctions off a priceless manuscript – the Gospels of Queen Theutberga” - from c. 825 – 850.

The post Gospels of Queen Theutberga up for Sale at Christie’s appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
This summer Christie’s auctions off a priceless manuscript – The Gospels of Queen Theutberga – from c. 825 – 850.

Last seen nearly twenty years ago a pristine early medieval manuscript – the alleged Gospels of Theutberga – from c. 825 – 850 will be auctioned off in mid-July by Christie’s. Somewhat conservatively valued between £1 – 1.5 mill, it is probably worth much more.

It is not likely to be bought up by a publicly owned collection. Hopefully, though, a new owner will allow a digitization of the manuscript in order to make it available to scholars as well as the general public.

The Manuscript

Theuteberga Gospels 3 @ ChristiesThe manuscript is a beautiful Gospel, probably written in Metz, or possibly at Murbach in 727 [1]. Tradition has it that the Gospel was part of Queen Theutberga’s valuables, which she brought with her to the abbey at St. Glossinde in Metz, where she took refuge in the 860s (see below). However, no form evidence may be found for this claim.

It holds 200 leaves and is in a remarkable condition. It is written in a dark brown ink in a fine Carolingian minuscule very slightly sloping to the right, with with the opening line of each chapter written in red capitals and line initials in alternating red or trees. The canon pages are in full colours (but no gold) including pale and dark green, slate grey, black, yellow-brown, red, pale and dark blue, white, etc. The manuscript was bound in 1933 in blind-stamped alum-tawed skin over wooden boards with sides tooled in a Celtic interlace pattern. The bind was made by Douglas Cockerell (1870-1945) and carries with his stamp inside the lower cover.

Provenance

The book is thought to have travelled with Queen Theutberga to the abbey at St Glossinde, Metz. Notes still visible in the manuscript show that it was later housed with Benedictine nuns 30 miles away in Poussay, in the 11th century, before disappearing from the records for around 500 years.

It resurfaced in the early 19th century library of Luxuei. From there, it passed through some of the greatest book collections of their kind, from Sir William Tite, president of the Royal Institute of British Architects, to the first Lord Peckover of Wisbech, and Charles Hornby.

By 1997, it was owned by the Beck Collection and sold for around £1million at Sotheby’s. From there, it passed on to an anonymous European collection.

Theutberga

theutebergas gospels ©Christies 2015Theutberga was a daughter of Boso the Elder, a member of the Bosonide clan, a powerful and well connected force in Lotharingia/Lorraine. Her brother, Boso, married the daughter of emperor Louis II and empress Angelberga. Her sister, Richild, was married to Count Biwin, an Austrasian noble; their daughter, also Richild, became the second wife of Charles the Bald.

Lothar II of Lotharingia was a great-grandson of Charlemagne. He ruled the middle kingdom North of the Alps between France and Germany. He had a mistress, Waldrada, with whom he had four children. However, in 855, he was compelled to marry Theutberga, whose brother was in the position of blocking an attack over the Alps. Nevertheless, soon after the threat of war faded Lothar went back to Waldrada and Theutberga remained barren. In order to have his children with Waldrada legitimized, Lothar tried repeatedly to have his marriage dissolved and in this connection he accused Theutberga of an incestuous relationship with her brother Hugobert. After the accusation, Hugobert and Theutberga fled to Lothar’s uncle, Charles the Bald, who took them in and gave her refuge in a nunnery. She proved her innocence of incest by ordeal within the year and Lothar was forced to take her back. Immediately afterwards, he imprisoned her until she asked to have her marriage dissolved that she might enter a convent.

At this point Lothar renewed his accusations and demanded a public confession, which she apparently conceded to out of fear of torture. The king also convened an ecclesiastical tribunal, while Theutberga once more escaped to her brother.

The bishops of Lotharingia wrote to Hincmar of Reims to ask if a woman could conceive a child and remain a virgin, to which he answered that with witchcraft the female vulva could attract sperm without copulation, but he did not accept that her guilt had been established as prescribed in canon law; he did however say that a man’s lover (in this case Waldrada) could by sorcery prevent the man from impregnating a woman, so he recommended the exorcism of Lothar rather than divorce from Theutberga.

Nevertheless, the bishops declared his marriage null and void in 862 and again in 863. But the Pope, to whom Theutberga had appealed, did not accept it.

Under pressure from his uncles, Lothar returned to Theutberga in 865, but he continued to pressure her for a separation on the grounds of her barrenness. When Lothar died in 869, on his way back from a visit to a later pope, Hadrian II, she had already retired to the abbey of St. Glossinde of Metz, where she remained until her death on 11 November 875.

NOTES:

According to the description made by Sotherby’s in 1997, the manuscripts “has an apparent provenance in Metz in the ninth century. After the death of Charlemagne, the great centres of illumination moved from Aachen to Tours, Rheims and Metz, the latter under the rule of the outstanding Bishop Drogo, bishop 823-55, who commissioned there some of the most impressive manuscripts of the century. In 1974, the late Professors Carl Nordenfalk and Bernhard Bischoff both compared the style of illumination of the present manuscript with that of the astronomical manuscript in Madrid (Biblioteca Nacional Cod.3307), illuminated at Metz between 820 and 840 for Drogo himself (W. Koehler, Die karolingische Miniaturen, III, 1960, pls.53-60; F. Mutherich and J.E. Gaehde, Carolingian Painting, 1977, no.XIII). These manuscripts use the same almost sketchy figure style with coloured washes and free brushstroke shading, clearly modelled on antique prototypes. Similar figure style and colouring occur in the great Drogo Sacramentary, one of the most important extant books of the mid-ninth century (Paris, B.N. ms.lat.9428, reproduced in facsimile, Drogo Sakramentar, ed. F. Mutherich, 1974). Other books written at Metz during the rule of Drogo include three further Evangeliaries (Paris, B.N. mss.lat 268, 9383 and 9388), a manuscript of St.Augustine on John, signed by the scribe Adelhart (Berlin, Staatsbibliothek MS.Phill.1662); and at least four further manuscripts once in the Bibliotheque de la Ville in Metz were destroyed in 1944 (mss.7, 76, 134 and 209). LITERATURE H. Engelhart, Die Wurzburger Buchmalerei im Hohen Mittelalter, 1987 (Quellen und Forschungen zur Geschichte des Bistums und Hochstifts Wurzburg, XXXIV), p.56, pl.205.” (The Gospels of Queen Theutberga of Lorraine, In Latin, Manuscript on Vellum by Sotherby’s). The new description of the manuscript presented by Christie’s concur in this provenance.

SOURCES:

Valuable Books and Manuscripts including Cartography
Sale 10455
London, King Street
15.07.2015

A full presentation of the manuscript may be had from the Christie’s catalogue

The Gospels of Queen Theutberga of Lorraine, In Latin, Manuscript on Vellum

Theutberga of Lothringia

READ MORE:

 

The Divorce of Lothar II, Christian Marriage and Political Power in the Carolingian WorldThe Divorce of Lothar II, Christian Marriage and Political Power in the Carolingian World
By Karl Heidecker
Ithaca: Cornell University, 2010).

 

 

 

 

 

Dissolving Royal Marriages. A Documentary History, 860 - 1600Dissolving Royal Marriages. A Documentary History, 860 – 1600
By David d’Avrey
Cambridge University press 2014
ISBN: 9781107062504

 

The post Gospels of Queen Theutberga up for Sale at Christie’s appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/gospels-of-queen-theutberga-up-for-sale-at-christies/feed/ 0
CfP for Being Medieval: Archaeology, Society and the Human Experiencehttp://www.medievalhistories.com/cfp-for-being-medieval-archaeology-society-and-the-human-experience/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/cfp-for-being-medieval-archaeology-society-and-the-human-experience/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 09:31:17 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14601 The Society for Medieval Archaeology’s 2015 conference will consider the experience of the Middle Ages: The focus is on what the material, biological or built remains can tell us from a social perspective

The post CfP for Being Medieval: Archaeology, Society and the Human Experience appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
The Society for Medieval Archaeology’s 2015 conference will consider the experience of the Middle Ages: The focus is on what the material, biological or built remains can tell us from a social perspective

SMA Annual conference 2015: Being Medieval: Archaeology, Society and the Human Experience
University of Central Lancashire, Preston
04.12.2015 – 06.12.2015

The Society for Medieval Archaeology’s 2015 conference will consider the experience of the Middle Ages: The focus is on what the material, biological or built remains can tell us from a social perspective. Speakers will address the issues of recognizing the experiential, the nature of society, inclusion, exclusion and transformation. They will explore what archaeology can tell us about economic or social changes, difference, life experience, expectation, life course or desires and disability.

Proposals for papers should be sent to Dr Duncan Sayer at (dsayer@uclan.ac.uk) and will take the form of a hundred-word summary that, if accepted, may be used in the conference programme. If you have any questions please contact Liz Roberts at ConferenceandEvents@uclan.ac.uk – for academic queries contact Duncan Sayer at dsayer@uclan.ac.uk.

The closing date for the receipt of proposals is 3 July 2015.

You can find out information about our recent conferences on the past conferences web page.

 

 

The post CfP for Being Medieval: Archaeology, Society and the Human Experience appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/cfp-for-being-medieval-archaeology-society-and-the-human-experience/feed/ 0
CfP for Moyen Âge et médiévalismehttp://www.medievalhistories.com/cfp-for-moyen-age-et-medievalisme/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/cfp-for-moyen-age-et-medievalisme/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 09:22:23 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14597 The Middle Ages is also a modern invention constantly reinvented by fiction-writers, film-makers and creators of games. Conference in march 2016 focus on the relationship between the Middle Ages and Medievalism

The post CfP for Moyen Âge et médiévalisme appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
The Middle Ages is also a modern invention constantly reinvented by fiction-writers, film-makers and creators of games. Conference in march 2016 focus on the relationship between the Middle Ages and Medievalism

Moyen Âge et médiévalisme, les formes de la domination
INHA – 2, rue Vivienne
Paris, France (75002)
04.03.2016 -05.03.2016

The Middle Ages is also a modern invention. Constantly reimagined by fiction-writers, filmmakers and creators of games one of the dominant motives, which is constantly reproduced is that of domination. Some reimagine the world of “those who built our cathedrals” while others evoke “rural life” as a friendly and peaceful place; both representing a freely constructed retro-projected common mythical past.

This conference focus on the motivation and interests behind these myths, while at the same time trying to explore the present context. According to the organisers, representing the Middle Ages is a way of taking sides in debates, struggles and contemporary commitments.

Full CfP can be read at Calenda.org

Deadline for submission of proposals: 30.09.2015

Contact

Elise Haddad
 : moyenagedomination@gmail.com (Primary contact)

Doina Craciun
 : moyenagedomination@gmail.com

Alicia Viaud
 : moyenagedomination@gmail.com

William Blanc
 : moyenagedomination@gmail.com

The post CfP for Moyen Âge et médiévalisme appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/cfp-for-moyen-age-et-medievalisme/feed/ 0
CfP for BUCEMA Vol 19 No 2http://www.medievalhistories.com/cfp-for-bucema-vol-19-no-2/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/cfp-for-bucema-vol-19-no-2/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 09:07:30 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14593 BUCEMA – Bulletin du Centre d’études médievales d’Auxerre – focus on interdisciplinary studies inside medieval archaeology, historical anthropology and art history

The post CfP for BUCEMA Vol 19 No 2 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
BUCEMA – Bulletin du Centre d’études médievales d’Auxerre –  is focused on interdisciplinarity with a focus on archaeology, historical anthropology and art history

BUCEMA is a lively French journal, which publishes articles on new research, interviews, presentations on dissertations and book reviews. Occasionally BUCEMA publishes special issues. The most recent focused on the lay habitations, workshops and hospitals, which surrounded monasteries. (Hors-série n°8 | 2015
Au seuil du cloître : la présence des laïcs (hôtelleries, bâtiments d’accueil, activités artisanales et de services) entre le Ve et le XIIe siècle.) It is dedicated to interdisciplinarity with a focus on archaeology, historical anthropology and art history. It especially seeks to promote initiatives which touch upon the use of digital informational technologies and their use inside medieval history research.

BUCEMA has posted a call for papers for vol 19 No 2. Deadline for submission of papers is 31. August 2015.
Contact: bucema.contact@gmail.com

BUCEMA is published as open-access at revues.org/openEdition

 

The post CfP for BUCEMA Vol 19 No 2 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/cfp-for-bucema-vol-19-no-2/feed/ 0
CfP for The Year’s Work in Medievalism Vol 30http://www.medievalhistories.com/cfp-for-the-years-work-in-medievalism-vol-30/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/cfp-for-the-years-work-in-medievalism-vol-30/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 08:56:12 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14590 CfP for The Year’s Work in Medievalism 2015, Vol 30 The editors of The Year’s Work in Medievalism, a refereed journal published under the auspices of the International Society for the Study of Medievalism invites essays to be submitted for consideration for publication in its volume 30 (2015). Participants at the 29th International Conference (Georgia Tech) …

The post CfP for The Year’s Work in Medievalism Vol 30 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
CfP for The Year’s Work in Medievalism 2015, Vol 30

The editors of The Year’s Work in Medievalism, a refereed journal published under the auspices of the International Society for the Study of Medievalism invites essays to be submitted for consideration for publication in its volume 30 (2015). Participants at the 29th International Conference (Georgia Tech) and SiM sections at Kalamazoo 2015 are especially encouraged to consider sending revised versions of their conference presentations.

However, equal considerations to all other (independent) papers will be given. Please send inquiries and finished papers to E. L. Risden (edward.risden@snc.edu), and see the website – http://www.medievalism.net for additional information about the journal and its focus and requirements. Please distribute this invitation widely among colleagues. For full consideration, please submit your essay by August 10, 2015.

ABOUT THE SOCIETY:

The International Society for the Study of Medievalism is an academic organization that intends to promote the interdisciplinary study of the popular and scholarly reception of the Middle Ages in postmedieval times. It is based on the work and studies of Leslie J. Workman (1927-2001), who is universally recognized as the founder of the academic study of medievalism in the English-speaking world. Officers and members of the organization currently maintain a peer-reviewed journal, Studies in Medievalism, an annual publishing conference proceedings and shorter essays (The Year’s Work in Medievalism), and a review journal, Medievally Speaking. They also organize annual onference sessions at the International Conference on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University and the International Medieval Congress at the University of Leeds, and have held their own annual International Congress on Medievalism at institutions of higher education world-wide.

 

The post CfP for The Year’s Work in Medievalism Vol 30 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/cfp-for-the-years-work-in-medievalism-vol-30/feed/ 0
Frühmittelalterliche Studien 2015 Vol 48 No 1http://www.medievalhistories.com/fruhmittelalterliche-studien-2015-vol-48-no-1/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/fruhmittelalterliche-studien-2015-vol-48-no-1/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 08:38:16 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14583 Frühmittelalterliche Studien is considered an important forum for comprehensive and interdisciplinary medieval studies

The post Frühmittelalterliche Studien 2015 Vol 48 No 1 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
Frühmittelalterliche Studien is considered an important forum for comprehensive and interdisciplinary medieval studies

Frühmittelalterliche Studien Volume 48, Issue 1 (Jun 2015)

Articles:

FEATURED PHOTO:

The Prittlewell Prince

The post Frühmittelalterliche Studien 2015 Vol 48 No 1 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/fruhmittelalterliche-studien-2015-vol-48-no-1/feed/ 0
Deutsches Archiv für Erforschung des Mittelalters 2014 Vol 70 No 2http://www.medievalhistories.com/deutsches-archiv-fur-erforschung-des-mittelalters-2014-vol-70-no-2/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/deutsches-archiv-fur-erforschung-des-mittelalters-2014-vol-70-no-2/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 08:14:40 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14577 The 'Deutsche Archiv für Erforschung des Mittelalters ' is one of the most prestigious German Historical Journals. It is also known as 'Deutsches Archiv'. It is published by Monumenta Germaniae Historica (MGH)

The post Deutsches Archiv für Erforschung des Mittelalters 2014 Vol 70 No 2 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
The ‘Deutsche Archiv für Erforschung des Mittelalters ‘ is one of the most prestigious German Historical Journals.

It is also known as ‘Deutsches Archiv’. It is published by Monumenta Germaniae Historica (MGH), which is the German Instit Deutschen Instituts für Erforschung des Mittelalters

Deutsches Archiv für Erforschung des Mittelalters 70 (2014), 2

Table of Contents:

  • 
The Codex Sangallensis 397. The Personal handbook of Grimald from St. Gallen? – Der Codex Sangallensis 397 − ein persönliches Handbuch Grimalds von St. Gallen? by Uwe Grupp
  • 
Annales Formoselenses and Annales Heremi II  – 
Annales Formoselenses und Annales Heremi II by Rudolf Pokorny
  • The first Glossator of Friedrick II’s Liber Augustalis  – Der erste Glossator des Liber Augustalis Friedrichs II by Michele Spadaccini
  • 
The Electors’ College. A result of medieval laws of inheritance?  – Das Kurfürstenkollegium − ein Ergebnis mittelalterlichen Erbrechtsdenkens? (521−539) by Eduard Hlawitschka
  • The Emperor Friedrick II, Petrus of Vienna and the after him named collections – Kaiser Friedrich II., Petrus de Vinea und die nach ihm benannten Mustersammlungen by Eduard Hlawitschka and Karl Borchardt
  • The German Order and the final battle at Acre – Der Deutsche Orden im Endkampf um Akkon  by Hans Eberhard Mayer
  • 
The newly found fragments of the Wormser Gloss over the Sachsenspiegel – Zu neu aufgefundenen Fragmenten der Wurm’schen Glosse zum Sachsenspiegel-Lehnrecht by Frank-Michael Kaufmann

Addenda

  • Charlemagne after 1200 years – Karl der Große nach 1200 Jahren (637−653) by Rudolf Schieffer
  • Regesta Imperii: The current progress 2014/2015 – Regesta Imperii. Bericht über den Stand und die Fortführung der Arbeiten im Jahr 2014/2015

 

The post Deutsches Archiv für Erforschung des Mittelalters 2014 Vol 70 No 2 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/deutsches-archiv-fur-erforschung-des-mittelalters-2014-vol-70-no-2/feed/ 0
Cuadernos Medievales 2015, No. 18http://www.medievalhistories.com/cuadernos-medievales-2015-no-18/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/cuadernos-medievales-2015-no-18/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 07:48:08 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14572 Cuadernos Medievales is an online journal published by the 'Grupo de Investigación y Estudios Medievales' at National University of Mar del Plata in Argentina

The post Cuadernos Medievales 2015, No. 18 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
Cuadernos Medievales is an online journal published by the ‘Grupo de Investigación y Estudios Medievales’ at National University of Mar del Plata in Argentina

Cuadernos Medievales 2015, No. 18
(Open Acess: In Spanish, but with English summeries)

Articles:

  • Cuadernos Medievales coverIdeal feminine models in Late Antiquity – Modelos femeninos en la Antigüedad Tardía, by Stefania Santelia
  • The orientation of the Cathedral in Chartres and its relation to the solstice. A neoplatonic lecture. – La orientación de la catedral de Chartres y su relación con los solsticios. Una lectura neoplatónica., by Maria Cecilia Tomasini
  • The medieval forest and the right to resistance towards lords – El bosque medieval y el derecho de resistencia de los dominados, by Cecilia Devia
  • Conciliarinism in the Catholic Concordance of Niclás de Cusa – Conciliarismo en De Concordantia Catholica de Nicolás de Cusa, by Juan Manuel Gerardi
  • Analogical thinking in the Chronicle of the Minorites by Marcos de Lisboa – O “pensamento analógico” nas Crónicas da Ordem dos Frades Menores, de Marcos de Lisboa, by Thiago Maerki

The post Cuadernos Medievales 2015, No. 18 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/cuadernos-medievales-2015-no-18/feed/ 0
En la España Medieval Vol 38 (2015)http://www.medievalhistories.com/en-la-espana-medieval-vol-38-2015/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/en-la-espana-medieval-vol-38-2015/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 07:30:15 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14568 En La Espana Medieval is published by Universidad Complutense de Madrid. It is dedicated to the history of the Middle Ages with special reference to the history of the Medieval Kingdoms in Iberia.

The post En la España Medieval Vol 38 (2015) appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
En La Espana Medieval is published by Universidad Complutense de Madrid. It is dedicated to the history of the Middle Ages with special reference to the history of the Medieval Kingdoms in Iberia.

 

En la España Medieval Vol 38 (2015)

(Open Acess: In Spanish, but with English summeries)

ARTICLES:

  • Transhumance and Livestock farming between Navarre and Guipuscoa during the Low Middle Ages and the beginning of the Early Middle Ages – Relaciones ganaderas entre Navarra y Guipúzcoa durante la Baja Edad Media y el comienzo de la Edad Moderna By Álvaro Aragón Ruano
  • Controlling the councilmen. The nobility of Talavera de la Reina and their methods of political intervention in the council in the Late Middle Ages – Controlando el regimiento. La nobleza de Talavera de la Reina y sus métodos de intervención política en el concejo en la Baja Edad Media , By Alicia Lozano Castellanos
  • Marginality and Otherness in Catalonia (14th – 16th centuries) – Marginalidad y otredad en Cataluña (siglos XIV-XVI) By Coral Cuadrada
  • Reform and consolidation of a financial asset. The juros al quitar in Juan and Alonso de Morales’ extraordinary treasury (1495 – 1504) – Reforma y consolidación de un activo financiero. Los “juros al quitar” en la “tesorería de lo extraordinario” de Juan y Alonso de Morales (1495-1504), by Federico Gálvez Gambero
  • The Espionage in the kingdoms of the Iberian Peninsula at the beginning of the 15th century – El espionaje en los reinos de la Península Ibérica a comienzos del siglo XV, by Santiago González Sánchez
  • Rural communities and Management issues in the jurisdiction of Piedrahíta (15th century)– Concejos rurales y aspectos de gestión en la tierra de Piedrahíta (siglo XV), by Laura da Graca
  • A papal brief from Inncent VIII to the Spanish Catholic Monarchs, which they never received, and funding of Holy Places – Un breve de Inocencio VIII dirigido a los Reyes Católicos, que nunca recibieron, y la financiación de los Santos Lugares, by Víctor de Lama
  • “Carne dela su carne & huesos delos sus huesos”: the cannibal mother and the bodily identity in Castigos del rey don Sancho IV– “Carne dela su carne & huesos delos sus huesos”: la madre caníbal y la identidad corporal en “Castigos del rey don Sancho IV”, by Alejandro Morin Morin
  • Settlement and bioarchaeological approach of medieval Repopulation in Campo de Montiel: Peñaflor– Aproximación urbana y bioarqueológica de la Repoblación medieval del Campo de Montiel: Peñaflor, by Pedro R. Moya-Maleno and Alfonso Monsalve Romera
  • Neither Tui, nor Gibraltar. Óláfr Haraldsson and the Iberian Peninsula – Nem Tui, nem Gibraltar: Óláfr Haraldsson e a Península Ibérica, by Helio Pires
  • Some considerations about the concession, collection and expenditure of the royal “pedido” in Seville and its lands in 1454.  Algunas consideraciones en torno a la concesión recaudación y gasto del pedido regio en Sevilla y su tierra en 1454 by José Manuel Triano Milán and Julieta Rodríguez Sarria

 

The post En la España Medieval Vol 38 (2015) appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/en-la-espana-medieval-vol-38-2015/feed/ 0
This Year’s Work in Medievalism 29 (2014)http://www.medievalhistories.com/this-years-work-in-medievalism-29-2014/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/this-years-work-in-medievalism-29-2014/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 06:56:05 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14563 Volume 29 (2014) of This Year's Work in Medievalism focus on Shakespeare.

The post This Year’s Work in Medievalism 29 (2014) appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
Volume 29 (2014) of This Year’s Work in Medievalism focus on Shakespeare.

This Year’s Work in Medievalism 29 (2014)
Edited by E. L. Risden, Gale Sigal, and Richard Utz, with the assistance of our associate editors, Shiloh Carroll and Renée Ward.

Table of Contents:

  • L. Risden: Introduction
  • Glenn Steinberg: Teaching Shakespeare’s Sources and Contexts
  • William Hodapp: Shakespearean Medievalism in Performance: The Second Tetralogy
  • Bonnie J. Erwin: “Is This Winning?”: Reflections on Teaching The Two Noble Kinsmen
  • Leigh Smith: “The matter that you read”: Saxo Grammaticus as a Source for Shakespeare and a Resource for Teachers of Hamlet
  • Brandon Alakas: Shakespeare’s Medievalism and the Life Removed: Depictions of Religious in Measure for Measure
  • Karl Fugelso: Cecco Bonanotte’s Moving Illustrations of the Divine Comedy
  • Heta Aali: Early Nineteenth-Century French Historiography and the Case of the Merovingian Queens
  • Sandra Gorgievski: Secret Gestures and Silent Revelations: The Disclosure of Secrets in Selected Arthurian Illuminated Manuscripts and Arthurian Films

 

The post This Year’s Work in Medievalism 29 (2014) appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/this-years-work-in-medievalism-29-2014/feed/ 0
Medieval Feminist Forum 2015 Vol 50 No 2http://www.medievalhistories.com/medieval-feminist-forum-2015-vol-50-no-2-2/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/medieval-feminist-forum-2015-vol-50-no-2-2/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 06:51:19 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14558 Medieval Feminist Forum is an online, peer-reviewed journal of interdisciplinary scholarship on women and gender in medieval studies. New issue is out Medieval Feminist Forum 2015 Vol 50 No 2 (Full text of this issue is restricted to subscribers.) Articles Gender and Genre in La estoire de Seint Aedward le Rei: Reading Versions of Medieval …

The post Medieval Feminist Forum 2015 Vol 50 No 2 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
Medieval Feminist Forum is an online, peer-reviewed journal of interdisciplinary scholarship on women and gender in medieval studies. New issue is out

Medieval Feminist Forum 2015 Vol 50 No 2
(Full text of this issue is restricted to subscribers.)

Articles

  • Gender and Genre in La estoire de Seint Aedward le Rei: Reading Versions of Medieval Queenship By Alexandra Verini
  • Virgin’a End: The Suppression of the York Marian Pageants By Andrea R. Harbin
  • “And they shall be two in one flesh”: The Battle over the Virgin’s Body in the Life of Christina of Markyate by Alexandra Locking
  • “Nayles Large and Lang”: Masculine Identity and the Anachronic Object in the York Crucifixion Play by Daisy Black

The post Medieval Feminist Forum 2015 Vol 50 No 2 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/medieval-feminist-forum-2015-vol-50-no-2-2/feed/ 0
500-year Anniversary of El Conde de Tendilla 1440 -1515http://www.medievalhistories.com/500-year-anniversary-of-el-conde-de-tendilla-1440-1515/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/500-year-anniversary-of-el-conde-de-tendilla-1440-1515/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 17:35:40 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14552 This year Granada commemorates the death of El Conde de Tendilla 1515 and the Centro de Estudios Históricos de Granada has organized an international conference

The post 500-year Anniversary of El Conde de Tendilla 1440 -1515 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
This year Granada commemorates the death of El Conde de Tendilla 1515 and the Centro de Estudios Históricos de Granada has organized an international conference

Íñigo López de Mendoza y Quiñones, (1440 –1515) was the first Marqués de Mondéjar. He was born in Guadalajara in the Kingdom of Castille and soon entered the royal court at Toledo. He first showed his military prowess in the war on Granada, which was the final part of the Reconquista. In 1486 he was named ambassador to the Pope. During his sojourn in Italy he became familiar with the Italian renaissance. In August 1487 he returned to Soain to take part in the final campaign on Granada. After the defeat of Boabdil and conquest of Granada in winter of 1492, King Ferdinand named Íñigo Governor of Alhambra and Captain General of Granada. During his tenure as governor, Conde Íñigo subdued the first Moorish uprising in Granada (1500–1502), which was brought about by the forced mass conversions enacted by Cardinal Francisco Jiménez de Cisneros. He would later command troops against further uprisings in Alpujarras along with King Ferdinand and the “Gran Capitan”, Gonzalo Fernández de Córdoba.

As a follow-up on the 500-year anniversary of his death, Centro de Estudios Históricos de Granada y su reino has organized an international conference. At the conference the the Spanish Association of Medievalists is holding their annual meeting.

El Conde de Tendilla y su tiempo
Granada
05.11.2015 – 07.11.2015

Contact:

info@condedetendilla.es
Centro de Estudios Históricos de Granada y su reino
Corral del Carbón
c/ Mariana Pineda s/n
18009 Granada

The programme can be found on the dedicated website

The post 500-year Anniversary of El Conde de Tendilla 1440 -1515 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/500-year-anniversary-of-el-conde-de-tendilla-1440-1515/feed/ 0
Harold Bluetooth’s Alleged Talisman Was Casthttp://www.medievalhistories.com/harold-bluetooths-alleged-talisman-undergoing-metallurgical-studies/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/harold-bluetooths-alleged-talisman-undergoing-metallurgical-studies/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 16:43:36 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14538 The peculiar gold-plaque allegedly found in Poland near Wolin with an inscription about Harold Bluetooth has undergone metallurgical studies

The post Harold Bluetooth’s Alleged Talisman Was Cast appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
The peculiar gold-plaque allegedly found in Poland near Wolin with an inscription about Harold Bluetooth has undergone metallurgical studies

Recently a strange golden object with an inscription about the Danish Viking King, Harold Bluetooth, resurfaced from an old box brought from Poland in the aftermath of WW2.

Disk with cross side © Sven Rosborn

“Harold Bluetooth” Disk with cross side © Sven Rosborn

Whether authentic or not, the object is in itself decidedly odd and would – even if fake – raise a number of questions. These have been carefully considered in a 12-page long essay in Swedish by the archaeologist, Sven Rosborn, which have been commented upon here

Recently research into the metallurgic composition of the gold-plaque was conducted on the 18.06.2015 in Lund. The preliminary results were these:

  • The plaque is solid, made of 89 – 92% gold
  • There are a lot of bubbles, which indicate the use of a primitive casting technique
  • The gold is not very well mixed with the other metals – silver, copper, tin etc. This might also indicate the plaque was produced under “primitive” circumstances.

A scientific group is currently being created in order to further research into the peculiar “find” and its context. So far Polish contacts have discovered slight signs of what might – perhaps – be a Viking Ringfortress in the landscape 2000 meters from the Medieval church, where the plaque was allegedly found

SOURCE:

A presentation of the metallurgical analysis may be found here

A link to Google map may be found here

READ MORE:

Read the story behind the find and some reflections about its alleged authenticity

SEE MORE:

SCientists and archaeologists discussing the find at Lund University

FEATURED PHOTO:

Meister des Registrum Gregorii
Registrum Gregorii with the Emperor Otto The great showing off the four parts of his realm ca. 985
© Musée Condé

The post Harold Bluetooth’s Alleged Talisman Was Cast appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/harold-bluetooths-alleged-talisman-undergoing-metallurgical-studies/feed/ 0
New Royal Mound from the 7th Century Discovered in Uppsalahttp://www.medievalhistories.com/new-royal-mound-in-uppsala-discovered/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/new-royal-mound-in-uppsala-discovered/#comments Tue, 30 Jun 2015 12:44:53 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14528 A long-forgotten royal mound in Uppsala from the 7th century has been found by chance. Archaeologists are excited.

The post New Royal Mound from the 7th Century Discovered in Uppsala appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
A long-forgotten royal mound in Uppsala from the 7th century has been found by chance. Archaeologists are excited.

New mound Uppsala 2015This summer archaeologists have been digging south of the Church in Old Uppsala. The plan was to find the old episcopal manor, before it was moved to Uppsala in 1275. This they found.

However, much more exciting was that beneath the medieval hall they found, what they believe is a new royal mound from the 7th century. The mound measures approximately 30 m in diameter and had been been damaged and encapsulated in the 12th c.; probably about the same time as the cathedral was built.

The archaeologists are a bit frustrated, though. They believe that the mound may very well hold a cremated burial complete with the remains of weapons and gifts, such as were found in the three other royal tombs at Uppsala. However the excavating teams lacks funding!

The Old Mounds

The area at Old Uppsala was well known as an archaeological site since the 16th century and has been excavated many times, with four major excavations in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.

Central is the area with the three largest mounds, the so-called royal mounds. Early on it was claimed that they held the remains of three mythic kings mentioned in Ynglingatal from the 9th century – Adis, Aun and Egil.

The mounds measure 55 – 70 meters in diameter and are 7 – 11 meter high. Two of the tombs have been excavated, the eastern mound in 1846 and the western mound in 1874. Both times the remains of cremations were found, holding tantalising fragments of helmets like the one found in Sutton Hoo and other luxurious items like a sword, several glassbeakers, a tafl game, a comb and a hone plus four cameos from the Middle East.

Excavations since 2012 have uncovered a number of spectacular buildings, which might corroborate part of the description of Uppsala as a sacred place found in Adam of Bremen. However, the results have not been published as yet and a final understanding of the important regional power centre.

Near that temple is a very large tree with widespread branches which are always green both in winter and summer. What kind of tree it is nobody knows. There is also a spring there where the pagan are accustomed to perform sacrifices and to immerse a human being alive. As long as his body is not found, the request of the people will be fulfilled. A golden chain encircles that temple and hangs over the gables of the building. Those who approach see its gleam from afar off because the shrine, which is located on a plain, is encircled by mountains so situated as to give the effect of a theatre. For nine days feasts and sacrifices of this kind are celebrated. Every day they sacrifice one human being in addition to other animals, so that in nine days there are 72 victims which are sacrificed. This sacrifice takes place about the time of the vernal equinox (Source: Adam of Bremen’s Gesta Hammaburgensis ecclesiae pontificum, Book IV. SRG, Hannover 1876.)

SOURCE:

Gamla Uppsala – a mythical centre

 

The post New Royal Mound from the 7th Century Discovered in Uppsala appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/new-royal-mound-in-uppsala-discovered/feed/ 0
Medieval Feminist Forum 2015 Vol. 50, No. 2http://www.medievalhistories.com/medieval-feminist-forum-2015-vol-50-no-2/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/medieval-feminist-forum-2015-vol-50-no-2/#comments Sun, 28 Jun 2015 09:14:50 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14518 Medieval Feminist Forum is an online, peer-reviewed journal of interdisciplinary scholarship on women and gender in medieval studies.

The post Medieval Feminist Forum 2015 Vol. 50, No. 2 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>

Medieval Feminist Forum is an online, peer-reviewed journal of interdisciplinary scholarship on women and gender in medieval studies.

The Journal: Medieval Feminist Forum is published by the Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship. SMFS promotes the study of the Patristic Age, the Middle Ages, and the Early Modern era from the perspective of gender studies, women’s studies, and feminist studies. It actively promotes and supports interdisciplinary exchanges at all levels of higher education across the world. Members represent every continent and every academic discipline within the arts & humanities.

Current Issue: Volume 50, Number 2 (2015)
Full text of this issue is restricted to subscribers.

Articles

Book Reviews

Questions of Gender in Byzantine Society p. 108-110
Kriszta Kotsis

FEATURED PHOTO:

St. Albans Psalter Project from the University of Aberdeen.: Mary announces the Resurrection (fol 51). Source: Wikipedia.

The post Medieval Feminist Forum 2015 Vol. 50, No. 2 appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/medieval-feminist-forum-2015-vol-50-no-2/feed/ 0
Deer and Identity in Medieval Irelandhttp://www.medievalhistories.com/deer-and-identity-in-medieval-ireland/ http://www.medievalhistories.com/deer-and-identity-in-medieval-ireland/#comments Sat, 27 Jun 2015 14:02:55 +0000 http://www.medievalhistories.com/?p=14502 The Gaelic lords in Ireland hunted Red deer, while the Anglo-Norman invaders built deer parks. Fiona Beglane tells us about the relation between deer and identity

The post Deer and Identity in Medieval Ireland appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
The Gaelic lords in Ireland hunted Red deer, while the Anglo-Norman invaders built deer parks. Fiona Beglane tells us about the relation between deer and identity

Deer and Identity in Medieval Ireland
By Fiona Beglane
in Kucera, M. and G-K. Kunst (eds.): Bestial Mirrors: Animals as material culture in the Middle Ages 2010. Vienna Institute for Archaeological Science, Vienna pp. 77-84.

ABSTRACT:

Greencastle in County Down
Greencastle in County Down

Identity is inextricably linked with places, landscapes and objects. It is only recently however that this idea has been extended to animals and their interaction with human society. The paper discuss the different arenas in which hunting took place in Gaelic and Anglo-Norman society before providing an overview of what is known about fallow deer and deer parks in Ireland. To illustrate the differences in approach between the cultures two case studies based on the author’s analysis of the faunal assemblages are presented, with Kilteasheen being a Gaelic site and Greencastle being Anglo- Norman

Until the twelfth century Ireland was predominantly Gaelic with the coastal cities such as Dublin and Limerick having been founded by the Vikings. This changed with the coming of the Anglo-Normans in the late twelfth century, when they settled in Ireland and introduced their own culture.

To the Gaelic lords with a tradition of cattle-raiding and successional disputes, the mountains, woodlands and bogs were an integral part of the landscape and the ability to range over these was vital in the petty warfare that was endemic in the medieval period. In these struggles it was primarily the taking and holding of livestock, not land or buildings, that conferred honour and nobility upon the participants and it has been noted in this context that few masonry castles were built by the Irish prior to 1400 and that the Anglo-Norman concept of the castle with its associated military and domestic features would have been alien.

Thus the Gaelic Irish took no interest in deer parks, but continued to concentrate on hunting the wild red deer. For the Gaelic aristocracy hunting the wild red deer was associated with nobility and honour.

By contrast, for an Anglo-Norman such as the clergyman and chronicler Gerald of Wales these open landscapes needed to be tamed and civilised by being brought into the agricultural arena. It has been argued that the introduction of deer parks to England resulted in the landscape becoming physically divided, reducing access for the lower orders and providing a visible sign of the status of the landowner. This would also have been the case in Ireland. The enclosure of parks tamed the landscape, both by directly enclosing wilderness and common land and by pushing agricultural activity further out into previously unused land. The importance of taming the landscape in gaining control of the country was recognised in 1619 by Sir John Davies, the attorney-general in Ireland for James I, who wrote that if the original conquest of Ireland had been followed up with more development of ‘Forrests, Chases, and Parkes’ then Ireland would have been long since subdued (Leerssen 1995).

It appears the development of parks would have had negative connotations and the hunting of fallow deer would have been of little symbolic importance. Fallow deer being kept in parks were neither wild nor domesticated, having attributes of both. It can be suggested that for the Anglo-Normans, hunting red deer across the unenclosed countryside was both part of the taming of the wild and a noble pursuit whilst hunting fallow deer within parks provided exercise in a civilised environment. The Anglo-Normans thus thrived in both settings.

The zooarchaeological results from Greencastle and Kilteasheen are typical of high-status medieval Anglo-Norman and Gaelic sites respectively. They demonstrate that despite a shared love of deer hunting and venison the differing approaches to how and where this was carried out are indicative of differences in the self-perceptions of the two cultures and in the maintenance of their separate identities.

Read the full article: Dear and Identity in medieval ireland

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Fiona Beglane is a lecturer in archaeology at the Institute of Technology, Sligo, and a consultant zooarchaeologist.

 

READ MORE:

Deer cattle and timber- Anglo-Norman parks in medieval Ireland, 1169-c.1350'.  By Fiona Beglane  Four Courts Press Dublin 2015Anglo-Norman parks in Medieval Ireland
By Fiona Beglane
Four Courts Press 2015
ISBN: 978-1-84682-569-9

This illustrated volume examines the evidence for medieval parks in Anglo-Norman Ireland. It is the first book on the subject and concentrates on the parks documented in the period 1169 to c.1350. Drawing on archaeological fieldwork, historical and place-name evidence, it generates a broad understanding of the role of parks in medieval society. It stresses the importance of the landscape and of the deer, cattle and timber within it as integral aspects of the material culture of high-medieval Ireland. The research is underpinned by extensive fieldwork, which has identified surviving park features in the landscape. Key topics explored include the form and function of medieval parks, their occurrence and location in the landscape, the status and identity of their owners and a comparison with parks elsewhere. Notably, the evidence suggests that both parks and fallow deer were relatively uncommon in Ireland compared to England. The reasons for this lie in chronology, landscape and politics, and these form a major theme within the book.

 

Medieval Lough Cé by Thomas Finan ed coverMedieval Lough Cé. History, archaeology and landscape
Thomas Finan, editor
Four Courts press 2010
ISBN: 978-1-84682-104-2

The role of Lough Ce and its relationship to the various lordships of north Roscommon in the later Middle Ages is examined in this collection of essays. Lough Ce was a vital geographic feature in relation to the MacDermot and O’Conor dynasties of the 13th and 14th century, and was the scene of a number of military incursions on the part of English lordships in the mid-13th century. Yet, this lake, and the history and archaeology of the region surrounding the lake, has rarely been examined as a landscape feature in, and of, itself.

Table of Contents:

  • Introduction: Moylurg and Lough Cé in the later Middle Ages by Thomas Finan
  • The Rock of Lough Cé, Co. Roscommon by Kieran O’Conor, Niall Brady, Anne Connon & Carlos Fidalgo
  • Remembering where the bishop sat: exploring perceptions of the past at the Bishop’s Seat, Kilteasheen, Co. Roscommon by Christopher Read
  • The rental of Holy Trinity abbey, Lough Cé by Miriam Clyne
  • Animal contact: livestock approaches to understanding social boundaries in later medieval Roscommon by John Soderberg & Jennifer L. Immich
  • Romanesque sculpture in north Roscommon by Rachel Moss
  • Deer in medieval Ireland: preliminary evidence from Kilteasheen, Co. Roscommon by Fiona Beglane
  • O’Conor ‘Grand Strategy’ and the Connacht Chronicle in the thirteenth century by Thomas Finan

The post Deer and Identity in Medieval Ireland appeared first on Medieval Histories.

]]>
http://www.medievalhistories.com/deer-and-identity-in-medieval-ireland/feed/ 0